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What You Need To Know About Taking In A Meal They Will Want To Eat

What food to make and tips to make it easier on you and the person you are helping

 Have you been asked, or even offered to take in a meal to someone?

I’ve got you covered here in  What You Need To Know About Taking In A Meal that They Will Want To Eat, and I can help you with this situation.

Even though you want to do this act of kindness, does the thought of taking in a meal, send panic running (or galloping) through your body?

Or do you get cold sweats worrying about what to take that they would want to eat?

And how in the world do you approach them in the first place?

Don’t worry, I’ve brought together valuable information just for you!

 

So, if you’re looking for tips on taking in food when there is a new baby,  someone had surgery, there’s an illness in the family, unfortunately a death – or just because you know it would cheer them up—

I’ve got What You Need To Know About Taking In A Meal They Will Want To Eat, along with recipes that are easy and varied for you to choose from.

These handy tips will  make your meal not only one that is enjoyed, but remembered as thoughtful and extremely appreciated.




What You Need To Know About Taking In A Meal they Will want to eat

A meal is always welcome and a VERY thoughtful gesture of friendship and kindness.

However, it can be a scary idea to think about feeding other people,  or their kids; especially if you don’t know them very well.

So, when do you take in a meal? What are the circumstances that says: FEED US PLEASE

Then, what do you say when contacting them about taking in a meal? 

Most importantly, how do you find out what they like, so they will enjoy it, meaning your time and resources are useful and not wasted?

I have it all covered, so you don’t need to worry.

 

When should you take In A Meal?

There are so many opportunities, but here are the most common:

 

The Appreciation Comes From The Details

Let’s be real, we all say ‘thank you’ to a meal and that we ‘like it’.

However, if we ask a few questions, we are going to be HERO’s as well as taking in a meal that will be REALLY enjoyed and EATEN.

Details such as:

 

       Using something disposable avoids situations such as: whose bowl does this belong to? Which unmarked pan does the young boy at the door want returned while his mother                  waits outside, not wanting to ‘be a bother’, as you are frantically trying to find the right lid          to ‘her pan’ in the myriad of  dishes stacked on the kitchen counter….which makes you                want to scream/cry/wish you had ordered out pizza that night. Disposable dishes all the            way baby. They make everyone happy!

       Or there’s the well-meaning neighbor stopping by to collect their dishes – when you’re not           feeling well as you recover, or finally just got the newborn to sleep… gggrrrr….So if that’s             you, neighbor….please do a favor and call ahead:) Actually, please just use disposable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

After delivering 5 cesarean babies,  several knee surgeries,  then total knee replacements on BOTH knees TWICE, adding in several other surgeries myself; not to mention all that has happened with 5 kids and a handsome hubby over upwards of 40 years of marriage; I have been a blessed recipient of numerous meals. Truly they have been such a gift.

I have also taken in, or delivered more meals in my adult life now than I can begin to count. 

So, from receiving, and giving, so many meals, I’ve learned some tips that I’ll share with you about how to make it a win-win situation for everyone involved, as well as EASY too! 

 

Did you know there’s Etiquette to taking in a meal?

1 Ask what time they would like the meal brought in to avoid any embarrassing complications.

 

2- Should you take in a homemade or pre-made/frozen/purchased meal or dish? That’s up to you.

 

3- Make sure whatever the meal is, that it’s completely ready to serve to make it easy on the person you are helping. Meaning, they do not have to prepare it in any way, shape or form.

 

4- This is not the time to try to impress them with your amazing culinary skills of grandeur – imagined or real, lol. Good old fashioned – comfort food is a winner every time.

 

5- Let the person know who you are bringing the meal into that you are:

A) just dropping off a meal (hot or one to be warmed up)

 

B) helping the kids have their dinner, cleaning up the dishes, getting the adults their dinner and tidying up afterwards – maybe you could even do a bit extra with the help of the kids:)

Only do what is comfortable for that person you are helping and best for you also. You don’t want to put yourself in a situation that is awkward, anymore than you do the person you want to help. It is very important to get the details clear before the meal is brought in. Either way, let them know you have only the best intentions and can leave it with the kids at the door if that’s best.

 

6- Give a couple of choices that you are able to make or provide for the meal; meaning within your budget and ability.

For example, I have a grand daughter who at the age of four will eat Kim-chi and we are not Korean. The girl will eat about anything and try everything that doesn’t run faster than her.

I have another grand daughter who likes……fast food pizza….oh and donuts:)

So ask the parents what ALL their kids will enjoy. Because you aren’t doing anyone a favor if they have to pull out the pans and make dinner after you leave to feed the kiddos.

It’s not being picky in my opinion, it’s just life, and if we are there to support a friend in that situation, let’s be a help and not a hindrance. (Meaning no comments or judgments, that are not charitable in nature or nice in tone at this sensitive time for the family.)

 

7- Let the person know if you are bringing in the entire meal; meaning sides and dessert. Or if you are just bringing in the main dish so they know what to plan on, and can make arrangements for the rest of the meal if needed.

 

8- Do all you can to NOT to be late or cancel. Confirm the day or night before so it is clear that you are bringing in what you have discussed, as well verify the time.

If something does come up that is completely unavoidable and prevents you from taking in a meal, make sure to apologize and take in a meal soon as possible, along with one for the freezer due to the inconvenience.

 

9- If taking in meals for a new baby, I have special ideas in my post ALL THINGS BABY

 

10- Sometimes the situation is more complicated and you need to know how to handle the emotions and what is happening with the person or family that you are serving. It can be hard to know what’s appropriate when illness, tragedy, suicide or any other situation of deep mourning occurs. What do you do? What do you say, or not say, is even more difficult. How can you help that is actually of benefit? I have some great information at my post: How Can I Help When Someone Is Sick And Show I Care? [1]

 

 

TIPS for taking in meals when someone is MOVING in or out

Take everything needed for the meal including:

 

 

 

 

BEST CHICKEN PASTA SALAD [5]

 

Asian Chicken and Orzo Pasta Salad [6]

 

The Easy Chicken Pot Pie and the Best Homemade Manicotti can be made and baked the same day or frozen for later use.

Both come with printable baking instructions to include with the gifted dish

Click HERE [7] for the Easy Chicken Pot Pie

Best Chicken PotPie

 

 

 

 

 

Click HERE [8] for Best Homemade Manicotti

Easy Stuffed Manicotti Pasta

 

 

 

 

 

 

More ideas:

Best Chicken Fajitas [9]

 

Best Anytime Chicken Tacos [10]

 

Easy Vegetarian Fajitas [11] also Gluten Free, and these are really

 

Best Homemade Meatballs [12]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easy Pizza Pasta Bak [13]e [13]

Easy Hot Cheese & Ham Sliders on Sweet Hawaiian Rolls

Copyright Carrie Groneman, A Mother’s Shadow, 2019

Recognize a blessing and be a blessing today.